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The Complete Vocabulary Builder Workbook

muckraking

IPA

How to pronounce muckraking (audio)

Dictionary definition of muckraking

A form of investigative journalism that aims to expose corruption, scandals, and wrongdoing in society, particularly among powerful individuals or institutions.
"The muckraking documentary shed light on the unethical practices of a multinational corporation."

Detailed meaning of muckraking

The term originated during the late 19th and early 20th centuries in the United States, when a group of journalists sought to shed light on social and political injustices. These muckrakers believed in the power of the press to bring about social change by uncovering hidden truths and holding those responsible accountable. Through in-depth research, interviews, and the publication of exposés, muckrakers played a crucial role in shaping public opinion and prompting reforms in areas such as labor conditions, political corruption, and consumer protection. Their work often provoked controversy and backlash from those in power, but it also paved the way for greater transparency and public awareness of societal issues. Muckraking, therefore, remains an essential component of journalism's watchdog function, continuing to inspire journalists to uncover and confront the darker aspects of our world in pursuit of a more just and informed society.

Example sentences containing muckraking

1. Muckraking journalists tirelessly investigate corruption and expose it to the public.
2. The muckraking article led to the resignation of a corrupt government official.
3. Muckraking plays a vital role in holding those in power accountable for their actions.
4. The muckraking reporter received numerous threats for her fearless investigative work.
5. The magazine's muckraking series exposed the exploitation of workers in the fashion industry.
6. The muckraking journalist won a prestigious award for her groundbreaking exposé on environmental pollution.

History and etymology of muckraking

The noun 'muckraking' has its etymological origins in the early 20th century in the United States. It is derived from the word 'muckrake,' which was coined by President Theodore Roosevelt in a speech in 1906. The term 'muckrake' was inspired by a character in John Bunyan's allegorical work 'The Pilgrim's Progress,' who was so engrossed in raking up filth that he couldn't look upward to seek salvation. In the context of journalism, 'muckraking' came to represent a form of investigative reporting that aimed to expose corruption, scandals, and wrongdoing in society, particularly among powerful individuals or institutions. The etymology of 'muckraking' thus reflects the idea of digging deep into the 'muck' or 'dirt' of society to uncover hidden truths and bring about social change, just as the character in Bunyan's work was fixated on raking up filth.

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Further usage examples of muckraking

1. Some argue that muckraking goes too far and sensationalizes issues for the sake of headlines.
2. The muckraking book became a bestseller, sparking national debates on corporate greed.
3. Muckraking journalism aims to uncover the truth and empower the marginalized.
4. The muckraking documentary filmmaker faced legal challenges but remained committed to revealing the truth.
5. Muckraking stories have the potential to inspire societal change and create a more just society.
6. Muckraking journalism has a long history of uncovering political scandals.
7. Investigative muckraking often leads to significant social change.
8. She received awards for her fearless muckraking reporting.
9. Muckraking articles can provoke important public discussions.
10. The muckraking journalist uncovered corporate fraud.
11. The muckraking exposé shook the foundations of the government.
12. Many admire the dedication of muckraking reporters.
13. Muckraking has been a vital tool in promoting accountability.
14. The muckraking documentary exposed environmental abuses.
15. He was known for his relentless muckraking investigations.
16. Muckraking can be a dangerous profession in some regions.
17. Muckraking stories often face legal challenges.
18. The impact of muckraking journalism can't be underestimated.
19. Her muckraking articles shed light on political corruption.
20. Muckraking reporting can be a catalyst for reform.
21. Muckraking has the power to dismantle corrupt institutions.
22. The muckraking journalist's work earned her enemies.
23. Muckraking is an essential pillar of a free press.
24. Their muckraking series won a Pulitzer Prize.
25. Muckraking thrives in the age of digital journalism.

disclosure,exposé,inquiry,investigation,journalism,probing,sleuthing,uncovering,unearthing

eb68db_e56cf82ad90a4b5898f87e4e21854d5f.mp3

exposing, covering, concealing, hiding

exposure,revelation,scrutiny

High School 16, GRE 15 (Graduate Record Examination), TOEFL 7

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