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inquisition

IPA

How to pronounce inquisition (audio)

Dictionary definition of inquisition

A formal investigation, usually by the government or church, aimed at uncovering and punishing individuals suspected of crimes such as heresy, blasphemy, or treason.
"Many people were accused of heresy during the inquisition."

Detailed meaning of inquisition

The term typically connotes a period of intense scrutiny and harsh punishment, often involving the use of torture to extract confessions. The Spanish Inquisition, for example, was a 15th and 16th century religious court established by the Catholic Church to maintain religious unity in Spain and root out heretics. Over the centuries, inquisitions have been criticized for their heavy-handed and often brutal methods, and the word "inquisition" is now often used to describe any overly harsh or intrusive investigation or questioning.

An inquisition is an official investigation or inquiry, usually one that is conducted with the power of compulsion and often with a significant degree of secrecy. The term comes from the Latin word "inquisitio" which means "examination" or "investigation."

Historically, the term inquisition refers to the Catholic Church's institutions of the Inquisition, which were established in the 12th century to combat heresy and apostasy, and to identify and punish those who deviated from the Catholic doctrine. These institutions were active mainly during the medieval and early modern period. The most famous of them was the Spanish Inquisition, which was established in 1478 by King Ferdinand and Queen Isabella of Spain.

Inquisition also can refer to any investigation or inquiry that is conducted in a similar manner to the medieval inquisition. It can be a legal or judicial investigation, or a political or administrative inquiry, with a significant degree of secrecy, power of compulsion, and often with the aim of identifying and punishing those who deviate from the dominant ideology or doctrine.

In modern times, the term inquisition is used in a negative sense, to describe investigations or inquiries that are perceived as unjust or oppressive, and that are conducted in a manner that is considered to be excessively secretive, intrusive, or punitive.

In short, An inquisition is an official investigation or inquiry, usually one that is conducted with the power of compulsion and often with a significant degree of secrecy, historically, the term inquisition refers to the Catholic Church's institutions of the Inquisition, which were established in the 12th century to combat heresy and apostasy, and to identify and punish those who deviated from the Catholic doctrine, in modern times, the term inquisition is used in a negative sense, to describe investigations or inquiries that are perceived as unjust or oppressive, and that are conducted in a manner that is considered to be excessively secretive, intrusive, or punitive.

Example sentences containing inquisition

1. The politician's questionable actions sparked a public inquisition.
2. During the Middle Ages, the Spanish Inquisition was notorious for its severity.
3. The child's inquisition into how things worked showed his budding interest in science.
4. After the scandal broke, the CEO faced an intense media inquisition.
5. The company was subject to an inquisition by the tax authority for possible evasion.
6. The surprise audit felt more like an inquisition than a routine check.

History and etymology of inquisition

The noun 'inquisition' has a significant historical and religious etymology. It originates from the Latin word 'inquisitio,' which means 'inquiry' or 'investigation.' The term was prominently associated with the medieval and early modern ecclesiastical courts of the Roman Catholic Church, such as the Spanish Inquisition, which were responsible for investigating and punishing heresy and religious dissent. These inquisitions conducted rigorous inquiries into matters of faith and were known for their often harsh methods of interrogation and punishment. Over time, 'inquisition' has come to represent any formal investigation, often conducted by governmental or religious authorities, aimed at uncovering and punishing individuals suspected of crimes such as heresy, blasphemy, or treason. Its etymology reflects its historical role as a means of maintaining orthodoxy and suppressing dissent within religious and political institutions.

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Further usage examples of inquisition

1. His fear of inquisition often stopped him from expressing his true thoughts.
2. The inquisition into the matter revealed the hidden facts.
3. The teacher's inquisition encouraged the students to think critically.
4. The police officer's inquisition was becoming uncomfortable for the witness.
5. The board of directors faced an inquisition by the shareholders at the annual meeting.
6. The town's inquisition ended when the culprit was finally caught.
7. Her private inquisition led her to unravel the mystery behind the family heirloom.
8. The strict inquisition of the border patrol made him nervous.
9. The recent inquisition by the health department resulted in stricter safety guidelines.
10. The author's new book is about the inquisition faced by the accused during the Salem Witch Trials.
11. The university's inquisition into the matter brought to light the issues within the administrative structure.
12. His inquisition into the paranormal phenomena intrigued many skeptics.
13. The celebrity's sudden disappearance led to a media inquisition.
14. The sudden inquisition made him realize the gravity of the situation.

grilling,hearing,inquiry,questioning,quizzing

eb68db_eae064e8fc7b4d46a3015e10f98827ec.mp3

inquiry, approval, endorsement, ratification

inquest,probe,trial

Control and Discipline, Criminal Justice and Penalties, Punishment and Enforcement

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