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The Complete Vocabulary Builder Workbook

tautology

IPA

How to pronounce tautology (audio)

Dictionary definition of tautology

A statement or phrase in which the same information is repeated twice, using different words or phrases.
"The phrase 'exact same' is a tautology, as 'exact' and 'same' mean the same thing."

Detailed meaning of tautology

It is a type of redundancy in which the same idea is expressed twice, in a way that is not necessary. Tautologies can happen in spoken or written language, and they can be found in various forms such as phrases, clauses or sentences. For example, "The reason why is because" is a tautology, as the phrase "because" already implies "the reason why" and it's redundant to use both. Another example is "free gift" as the word "free" already implies that it's a gift, so the word gift is redundant. Tautologies can make the language wordy, and it can make the text less clear, less precise and less engaging. They can also make the text less efficient and more difficult to understand. Avoiding tautology is an important aspect of good writing, as it can help to make the text more concise, precise, and engaging.

Example sentences containing tautology

1. The statement "It's either black or white" is a tautology, as it repeats the same information twice.
2. The statement "It's either true or false" is a tautology, as it repeats the same information twice.
3. The phrase "free gift" is a tautology, as "free" and "gift" mean the same thing.
4. The statement "It's either alive or dead" is a tautology, as it repeats the same information twice.
5. The phrase "added bonus" is a tautology, as "added" and "bonus" mean the same thing.
6. The statement "It's either necessary or unnecessary" is a tautology, as it repeats the same information twice.

History and etymology of tautology

The noun 'tautology' has its origins in Greek, specifically from the word 'tautologia,' which is a combination of 'tauto,' meaning 'the same,' and 'logia,' meaning 'saying' or 'speaking.' In Greek rhetoric and philosophy, 'tautologia' referred to the repetition of the same idea or meaning using different words or phrases, often seen as a form of redundancy. As this term made its way into English, 'tautology' retained its original sense, describing a statement or phrase in which the same information is repeated unnecessarily, usually with different words or expressions. The etymology of 'tautology' underscores the concept of saying the same thing twice, emphasizing the lack of added value in such repetitive statements.

Quiz: Find the meaning of tautology

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Further usage examples of tautology

1. The phrase "end result" is a tautology, as "end" and "result" mean the same thing.
2. The statement "It's either possible or impossible" is a tautology, as it repeats the same information twice.
3. The phrase "basic fundamentals" is a tautology, as "basic" and "fundamentals" mean the same thing.
4. The statement "It's either right or wrong" is a tautology, as it repeats the same information twice.
5. The phrase "new innovation" is a tautology, as "new" and "innovation" mean the same thing.
6. Redundant tautology in writing diminishes clarity and impact.
7. His lengthy speech was marred by the inclusion of needless tautological phrases.
8. Writers should strive to avoid the use of unnecessary tautologies.
9. The expression "free gift" serves as a quintessential example of a tautology.
10. The prevalence of tautology can lead to verbosity and reduced readability.
11. Repeated tautological elements can quickly become tiresome to readers.
12. Effective communicators consciously steer clear of falling into the trap of tautological redundancies.
13. In constructing persuasive arguments, it is imperative to eschew reliance on logical tautologies.
14. The removal of distracting tautology from one's writing can greatly enhance its overall quality.
15. The tautology present in his writing served as a noticeable distraction for discerning readers.
16. A commitment to reducing tautology in one's writing can result in greater clarity and impact.
17. The presence of tautology within a statement often renders the point redundant and less impactful.
18. Tautology frequently arises from the use of imprecise language and lack of linguistic economy.
19. Achieving conciseness and precision in language is an effective strategy for eliminating tautological elements.
20. The pervasive tautology throughout his writing detracted from the overall quality of the work.
21. By diligently removing instances of tautology, the clarity and precision of the message can be heightened.
22. Well-edited texts undergo careful scrutiny to identify and eliminate instances of tautological redundancy.
23. Tautology, with its inherent repetition, detracts from the effectiveness and persuasiveness of communication.
24. His statement exhibited a perfect case of tautology, which diminished its impact on the audience.
25. The prevalence of tautology within the argument significantly weakened its overall persuasive power.
26. Skillful and effective writers consistently strive to eliminate any unnecessary tautological elements.
27. The overuse of tautology within language can lead to a decline in reader engagement and interest.
28. The repetitive nature of tautology often renders speeches and presentations predictable and uninteresting.
29. Striving for clear and effective communication involves a conscious effort to eliminate tautological redundancies.
30. The presence of tautology within written or spoken language can clutter the message and hinder comprehension.

prolixity,repetition,repetitiveness,verbosity

eb68db_5816b87d7b1a40aeb79da91b8efbb194.mp3

redundancy, originality, freshness, uniqueness

iteration,pleonasm,redundancy,verbiage

GRE 3 (Graduate Record Examination), SAT 10 (Scholastic Assessment Test), Discussion and Argumentation

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