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Options and Determinations, Commitment and Responsibility, Governance and Authority, Latin Phrases and Expressions

ex-officio

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How to pronounce ex-officio (audio)

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Dictionary definition of ex-officio

Performed by virtue of holding a particular position or office, rather than by personal choice or appointment.
"The president of the company is also an ex officio member of the board of directors."

Detailed meaning of ex-officio

When someone does something ex-officio, it means they are carrying out a duty or responsibility that is automatically attached to their official position. This term is often used in administrative, legal, or formal contexts to indicate that a person is acting in an official capacity because of their role or title, not because they have chosen to do so independently. For instance, a company's CEO may serve ex-officio on the board of directors, which means they are a board member by virtue of their position as CEO. Similarly, a government official may have ex-officio voting rights in a committee due to their role within a specific department. "Ex-officio" underscores the connection between an individual's official role and the actions they take in that capacity.

Example sentences containing ex-officio

1. As the chairman, he is ex-officio a member of all subcommittees, guiding our decisions.
2. The president serves ex-officio as the head of the board, ensuring strategic direction.
3. The dean is ex-officio a member of the faculty committee, overseeing academic affairs.
4. The mayor is ex-officio the chairperson of the city council, leading legislative actions.
5. The CEO is ex-officio a director on the company's board, driving corporate decisions.
6. The governor is ex-officio the commander-in-chief of the state's military, ensuring security.

History and etymology of ex-officio

The adverbial phrase 'ex officio' has its etymology rooted in Latin. 'Ex' means 'out of' or 'from,' and 'officio' derives from 'officium,' which means 'duty,' 'office,' or 'position.' In Latin, 'ex officio' signified actions or roles performed by virtue of holding a particular position or office, rather than by personal choice or appointment. This phrase acknowledges that certain responsibilities or privileges are automatically conferred upon individuals by virtue of their official positions. In contemporary English, 'ex officio' describes actions or decisions made as a direct consequence of one's role or office, emphasizing that they are not taken out of personal choice but are inherent to the position itself. The etymology of 'ex officio' underscores its essence as a term that highlights the connection between official roles and the actions or responsibilities associated with them.

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Further usage examples of ex-officio

1. The judge serves ex-officio as the court's presiding officer, upholding justice.
2. The bishop is ex-officio the leader of the diocese, guiding religious matters.
3. The president is ex-officio the spokesperson for the organization, representing our values.
4. The principal is ex-officio the head of the school's administration, overseeing daily operations.
5. The attorney general is ex-officio the chief legal officer of the state, upholding laws.
6. The treasurer is ex-officio responsible for the organization's finances, ensuring fiscal health.
7. The superintendent is ex-officio the head of the school district, managing education.
8. The secretary is ex-officio in charge of recording meeting minutes, maintaining records.
9. The sheriff is ex-officio responsible for law enforcement in the county, ensuring safety.
10. The minister is ex-officio a member of the church council, guiding spiritual matters.
11. The chancellor is ex-officio the chief executive of the university, leading academia.
12. The chief justice is ex-officio the head of the judiciary, interpreting the law.
13. The captain is ex-officio the leader of the team, motivating and directing players.
14. The speaker of the house is ex-officio a member of Congress, guiding legislative matters.
15. The editor-in-chief is ex-officio responsible for the publication's content, ensuring quality.
16. The president is ex-officio the head of state, representing our nation.
17. The principal is ex-officio responsible for school policies, shaping our educational approach.
18. The mayor is ex-officio the leader of the municipal government, governing our city.
19. The CEO is ex-officio the highest-ranking officer in the company, driving success.
20. The judge is ex-officio the final authority in the courtroom, dispensing justice.
21. The dean is ex-officio the academic leader of the college, shaping our curriculum.
22. The governor is ex-officio the chief executive of the state, leading our government.
23. The bishop is ex-officio the spiritual leader of the diocese, guiding our faith.
24. The president is ex-officio the commander-in-chief of the military, ensuring our defense.

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